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Ashiatsu – Barefoot Massage

by altm425

Have you heard of Ashiatsu? It is a barefoot massage technique that uses deep compression effleurage strokes that glide over the body. The massage therapist has bars above the massage table which are secured into the ceiling, and the therapist uses their feet to apply deep broad massage strokes. The bars are used to allow the therapist to hold on to for balance. Ashiatsu allows the therapist to utilize their feet and body weight to provide a deep yet broad massage strokes. This massage modality provides deep relaxation, stimulates the lymphatic system, increases circulation, elongates the spine, stretches shortened muscles, relieves muscular discomfort and pain, relieves tight muscles and stress, and improves postural deviations.

It is great for all clients in that the therapist can still adjust the amount of pressure. Clients that may not like the deep pressure can still receive a very effective and relaxing massage with this modality because the pressure is broad, not pointy such as an elbow. Clients that enjoy the deep pressure can benefit from the deep pressure of the bodyweight of the therapist, gravity allows the pressure to be deeper than with hands-on. It is great modality for all types of massage.

The history of Ashiatsu comes from the pioneer of the modality Ruthie Hardee, it is a western modality with roots from the Philippines and then from India. The name Ashiatsu comes from “ashi” meaning foot and “atsu” means pressure so that together it is foot pressure.

I use a combination of Ashiatsu and traditional massage with hands and forearms. I enjoy using the Ashiatsu to help assess the tissue and warm up the muscles. Then if necessary I will do more specific work with stripping the muscle, cross friction fiber strokes and Chinese fire cupping.

Try it! Once you do you won’t want to go back!! Book your massage today at www.activelifetm.com!

 

Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy/Deepfeet Bar Therapy. Presented by Health & Bodyworks Ruthie Piper Hardee

Deepfeet.com

 

 

 

 

All Moved In

by altm425

We have moved into a new studio! It was a tough and challenging transition, but I couldn’t be happier!! The Ashiatsu bars are installed and perfect! The hydraulic table will be in next week!  Everything is coming together wonderfully and I couldn’t have done it without the help of my amazing team behind me!  Welcome to the new location!!!

Plantar Fasciitis

by altm425

Is Plantar Fasciitis Causing You Pain?

 

Massage therapy can help with the pain associated with plantar fasciitis! Massage therapist can help release the tension in the plantar fascia as well as the leg muscles from the calves to the glutes, along with stretching the calf, heel and foot.

Stretching the calves regularly can help in the healing process to keep the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles flexible. You can do this by doing a slight lunge and leaning towards a wall, or by dropping your heels while standing on a stair or curb. You can also use a towel or belt to stretch when you get up and before you go to bed.

Self massage to the plantar fascia can help alleviate pain as well, however you do not want to do this during the acute phase (when the pain is very high) as it will be very uncomfortable. You can use a can of soup, a tennis ball, or a golf ball to roll the bottom of the foot. if you have a desk job put a golf ball under your desk and take your shoes off, keep the plantar fascia loose while you work away! Another great relief is an iced water bottle, ice helps reduce pain and can provide relief during acute phases. Doing these stretches and tips to help with pain twice a day can help improve the pain you feel from plantar fasciitis.

Foam rolling is another fantastic self care tool you can do at home! It will help release tension in the leg muscles! Using it on your glutes, hamstrings and calves. You can also release tension in the glutes by using a tennis ball or a lacrosse ball by sitting on the ball and doing slight movements in your hips.